Skip to content.
VIEW SITE IN te reo Māori

Tips and Advice

We asked the principals and staff behind successful entries how they approached their Award entries, as well as asking members of our education experts and judging panels for some information about what makes a great entry.

Current awards status
Finalists announced
View the finalists

Watch the videos for some helpful hints on sharing your story.

 

TIPS FROM PREVIOUS FINALISTS AND WINNERS.

 

 Plan ahead 

Start your story as soon as you decide to enter and note down all thoughts and observations as they come to you. This will help when you come to write your case study if you already have the "must mention" bullet points.

 Find your purpose 

Be clear about the overarching purpose of your programme and identify the main strands. Then break these down separately, explaining the idea(s) behind them, how they have evolved, and how they have worked for your overall purpose.

 Stay close to your story 

Make sure your entry is put together by the people close to your case study or story. Don't rely on a third party to do this.

 Use your time wisely 

Use the Christmas holidays and your available time well – you’ll need all the time given and more.

 Get some clarity 

Ensure you have clarity around the entry for all stakeholders in your school or early learning/childhood service. Have them on board so they're able to share or confirm your story.

 Engage your students 

The best advocates for your story/case study are your students. Include them in your entry.

 Gather your evidence 

Data is important. If you’re in ECE this can be challenging, so put as much base data in your entry as you can. Try and include data from whānau on what children are achieving.

 Look for the benefits 

Keep a broad view in terms of the benefits – to all children. Give emphasis to the different feed-through effects for your school or ECE service.

 Keep it real 

Make sure what you say is real. If you’re shortlisted as a finalist, your entry and what people say must be natural and not contrived.

Back to top

© 2017 MINISTRY OF EDUCATION NEW ZEALAND

Close modal