Tips from judges and past entrants

Kōrero āwhina

When you enter the Awards, you’ll be asked to share the story of your group, team or partnership — supported by evidence — in a way that allows our judging panel to understand and appreciate what you’ve achieved.

Kia uru koe ki Ngā Tohu, ka tonoa koe ki te tuari i tō koutou kōrero ko tō rōpū, tīma, whakahoatanga rānei — me ngā taunakitanga — kia noho mārama tonu te pae whakawā ki tā koutou i whai ai, ā, i tutuki ai.

HELPFUL HINTS ON SHARING YOUR STORY

HE KŌRERO ĀWHINA MŌ TE TUARI I TŌ KŌRERO

PLAN AHEAD

Start recording your story as soon as you decide to enter and note down any thoughts and observations you have along the way. It will help when you come to write your case study if you already have some "must-mention" bullet points.

FIND YOUR PURPOSE

Be clear about the overarching purpose of your programme and identify the main strands of your story. Explain the idea(s) behind these strands, how they evolved and how they helped you achieve your overall purpose.

STAY CLOSE TO YOUR STORY

Make sure your entry is put together by the people closest to your case study or story — don't rely on a third party to do this for you.

GET EVERYONE ON BOARD

Get all the relevant stakeholders in your school, kura or early learning service on board so they're available to share or confirm your story. Make sure they’re clear about why you’re entering and what you hope to achieve.

ENGAGE YOUR LEARNERS

The best advocates and evidence for your story/case study are your learners. Include them in your entry wherever you can.

GATHER YOUR EVIDENCE

Data and baseline information is important. If you’re in early learning, this can be particularly challenging — so put as much baseline information and data into your entry as you can. Try and include information and data from whānau on what their children are achieving.

SHOW THE BENEFITS

Keep a broad view in terms of the benefits to all children and young people and the resulting effect on the community. Give emphasis to the different feed-through effects for your school, kura or early learning service.

KEEP IT REAL

Make sure what you say feels real and easy to relate to. In order to be shortlisted as a finalist, your entry and what people say in it must be natural and not contrived.

Me Whakamahaera Wawe

Me tīmata te tuhi i ō kōrero i te rangi tonu e whakatau ana koe kia whakauru mai, arā, me tuhi katoa ō whakaaro me ō tirohanga i te pupūnga ake. Hei āwhina tēnei i a koe kia tuhi i tō take wānanga, nā te mea kua tuhia kētia e koe ngā kaupapa matua me "mātua whakaatu ki te ao".

Kimihia Te Pūtake O Ō Mahi

Kia mārama tonu koe mō te pūtake torowhānui o tō kaupapa, ā, tautuhia ōna whenu matua. Wetekina, whakamāramatia te whakaaro i muri e takoto ana, he pēhea i tupu mai ai, he pēhea i tika ai mō tō pūtake torowhānui.

Kia Noho Piri Mai Ki Tō Kōrero

Kaua e wareware kia tuia mai tō tono whakauru e te hunga tino pātata ki tō take wānanga, ki tō kōrero rānei. Kaua e tukua ki te tangata o waho i tō rōpū hei mahi i tēnei mahi.

Kia Kotahi Te Waka, Kia Kotahi Te Hoe

Me mātua whai kia uru mai ngā tāngata o tō kura, ratonga kōhungahunga rānei, kia wātea hoki rātou ki te tiri, ki te whakaū rānei i tō kōrero. Me whai anō kia noho mārama tonu rātou ki te take o te tono me tāu e whai nei.

Whakaohongia Ō Ākonga Ki Te Āwhina Mai

Ko ngā tino kaitautoko mō tō kōrero/take wānanga ko ō akonga tonu. Tukua he wāhi ki a rātou i tō tono whakauru. 

Kohia Ō Taunakitanga

He mea whaitake ngā raraunga me ngā pārongo taketake. He wero tēnei mō ngā kura kōhungahunga – nō reira me whakauru mai ngā pārongo taketake katoa e taea ana. Me whai kia uru mai ngā kōrero me ngā raraunga ma ii ngā whānau mō ngā tutukitanga o ā rātou tamariki.

Whakaatuhia ngā painga

Kia tuwhera tonu ngā whakaaro ki ngā painga mō ngā tamariki me ngā taiohi katoa me ngā hua o ēnei mō te hapori.

Kia Pono Tonu

Me mātua mōhio he pono ō kōrero katoa. Mehemea ka whiria tō tono hei tono whiriwhiri, me puta ko tōu reo ake, me te reo tonu hoki o te hunga o roto.

When you’re putting your entry together:

  • make sure you have plenty of comparative information, data and other evidence
  • make sure your evidence shows collaboration — don’t focus too much on one individual
  • tell a story about education excellence, not just business as usual. That means showing how the positive change your team achieved has enabled success and created great ongoing results for teachers, learners and their whānau and the community
  • make sure it’s clear what your team achieved and what the results were
  • ensure your story covers a long enough period to show clear results — we recommend at least two years.

I a koe e whakarite ana i tō tono:

  • Me mātua whai kia nui tonu ngā pārongo whakataurite, raraunga me ētahi atu taunakitanga
  • me mātua whakaatu e ngā tauanakitanga te mahitahi – kaua e arotahi ki tētahi tangata takitahi
  • takina tētahi kōrero mō te hiranga o te mātauranga, kaua mō ngā mahi noa o ia rā. Nā reira, me whakaatu i ngā rerekētanga i taea hei painga anō mō ngā ākonga, ngā kaiako, ō rātou whānau me te hapori
  • me mārama tonu ko tā koutou i tutuki ai me ngā hua i puta
  • me whai kia kapi i tō kōrero tētahi wā roa – ko te iti rawa kia rua tau.

WHAT MAKES A GREAT ENTRY?

HE PĒHEA TE ĀHUA O TE TONO PAI RAWA?

We asked members of our Judging Panel for information about what makes a great entry, as well as asking the principals, staff and team members behind successful entries how they approached telling their stories. Watch the videos below to see what they had to say.

I pātaihia ētahi o ngā kaiwhakawā mō ō rātou whakaaro mō te āhua o te tono pai rawa, me ētahi o ngā tumuaki, kaiako, me ētahi tāngata o ngā rōpū i toa i ngā tau ki mua mō te ara i whāia e ratou ki te tuku ā rātou kōrero. Mātakihia ngā ataata mō ō rātou kōrero.

The benefits of entering

Ngā painga o te tono

Visual

A man in white shirt and black trousers stands on a grassy hill surrounded by students in green and grey school uniforms. They look out over a park with pathways, trees and a stream. The man turns to the students and a few of them raise their hands to answer a question. A man wearing glasses and in a suit and striped tie has short hair and a goatee. A banner appears along the bottom of the screen. Text inside the banner reads: Henk Popping, Principal, Ōtūmoetai Intermediate School.

 

Audio

(Henk): The journey is all about empowering staff and creating great teachers – not curriculum, not buildings – but the actual people who work with the kids.

 

Visual

A woman with shoulder-length blonde hair wears a black jacket over an orange top. Her name appears in a banner along the bottom of the screen: Karla Ralph, Acting Principal, Coastal Taranaki School. In a school library adults sit around a table, having a meeting.

 

Audio

(Karla): We're very good at picking up what we're not doing well but not celebrating what we do well. We wanted to show New Zealand how amazing we are as a small school.


Visual

In the library, three children in teal and navy blue uniforms sit on a couch. The student in the middle presents a page from a workbook which shows a photo of herself in a vintage pinafore and straw hat. She turns the page to a photo of a boy in a vintage hat, grey shirt and suspenders. Words under the photo read: Hi, I’m Eli at school 100 years ago!

 

Audio

(Karla): It's also an opportunity to share and see other people's journeys and find out what they're doing within New Zealand. That collaboration, that sharing, is great because you can take a little bit from every school and put back in your own school. We had colleagues in other schools phoning us to say, ‘Hey! How did you become finalists?’ and ‘Can you please come in and share your story with our staff?’

 

Visual

A man with short grey hair wears a dark suit over a white shirt with a red and black striped tie. A banner along the bottom of the screen reads: Greg Mackle, Principal, Gisborne Boys’ High School. A chisel is used to carve in a woodwork classroom by a teenage boy in a grey uniform polo shirt. A man in a zip-up top stands beside him and gestures at the student’s work. Other panels of Māori carvings are leaned against the wall.

 

Audio

(Greg): No matter how little you might think it is for your school, you might be surprised what it means to a whole lot of other people, because those little things count. Every little school, every little ECE, every educational institution in New Zealand is doing wonderful things, and we should show it.

 

Visual

A woman with short brown hair wears a black dress and a long silver necklace. Her name is in a banner along the bottom of the screen: Dr Michelle Dalrymple, Head of Maths Faculty, Cashmere High School. Students in plaid patterned uniform skirts and white shirts walk towards a grey-coloured building with the words Cashmere High School, Te Iringa O Kahukura emblazoned above its doors. Next to the school’s name is a logo of a ship. Inside a classroom, students sit at desks grouped together in fours. The students have worksheets in front of them. The teacher at the front of the room holds a bright pink highlighter pen. She puts it in her mouth. A man in a blue shirt stands at the front of a class. A projection covers a screen next to him in columns of algebraic equations. His students stand with their arms raised and shuffle left and right.

 

Audio

(Michelle): It looked like a good opportunity to put our story together in one place, to bring all the different ideas together that have been going on. It made us aware of, possibly, some that we hadn't actively been aware of happening. Subtle shifts you sometimes don't notice the same until you sit back and look back and reflect on your journey.


Visual

On a park bench in front of a lush green garden sits a woman in a coral-coloured jacket, a woman with blue streaks in her grey hair that matches the frames of her glasses and the koru designs on her top and a man in a grey shirt with a pale coloured tie. A banner appears under the man in the grey shirt. Text in the banner reads: Jim Turrell, Principal, Limehills School.


Audio

(Jim): The process itself, the level of detail they went to to look at the data and dive deeper into the data and the decisions that they were making and the changes they were making to the programme. Just the process of going through the application form was a bit like a microcosm for how they can adapt that same way of thinking to their teaching. And I think it really did elevate them from—they thought of themselves as teachers, and now I think they really think of themselves as high-performing professionals.

 

Visual

The woman with the blue streaked hair and blue framed glasses nods. A banner appears under her: Sara Feringa, Trustee, Makoura College.

 

Audio

(Sara): We all knew they were doing well, but it just made the wider community look at it and go, ‘Wow, you are doing well!’ So that was a really valuable thing for the school.

(Jim): Absolutely.

 

Visual

As the woman in the coral-coloured jacket starts to speak, a banner appears bearing her name: Elizabeth Forgie, Principal, Kerikeri High School.

 

Audio

(Elizabeth): When we found out that we were a finalist, that was the big success. We didn't mind whether we won or not. It was just that we'd been recognised as a finalist.

 

Visual

Students in teal and navy blue uniform polo shirts smile and nod in a school library. In a classroom, a group of students in the same uniform perform a waiata. Small children paint using paint-splattered paint pots from a small caddy. Their painting table is outside in front of a fence made of logs.

 

Audio

(Karla): Our students were immensely proud of what they had done, and it was all about them. They were very excited, though, when we told them that there's a film crew coming into school and we had some judges, and they wanted to go to the marae, and they wanted to have their families in.

Visual

A woman with frameless glasses and long auburn hair wears a black and white patterned cardigan. Her name appears in the banner at the bottom of the screen: Dy Stirling, Kaihautū, Nōku Te Ao. Small children run about a playground and a water-play table which is home to brightly coloured water wheels and funnels. A woman with long blonde hair and wearing a black top and grey sweatpants waves a bubble wand, leaving a trail of bubbles in the air. At the water-play table, a small girl in a purple butterfly top uses an old yoghurt pot to tip water into a funnel.

 

Audio

(Dy): For the trustees themselves, it gave us an opportunity to actually really look at what our governance had done and who they were and what they did for us. And it's given everyone more of an appreciation of the work they actually do behind the scenes and allow us to grow the way we need to.
(Greg): It's not really about competition and winning. That's important, but the most important thing, I think, the value of doing it, is being able to recognise the people who make things happen in your school.

 

Visual

A group of teenage boys in a red-trimmed grey and black school uniform sit on the bench seats of a school hall. Coloured flags hang above the empty stage and panels bearing names in a gold-coloured text decorate the walls. A man in shorts and working boots gestures around the hall. He then appears in a black suit, white shirt and black tie to be interviewed. His name is in a banner along the bottom of the screen: Craig Callaghan, Head of Māori Studies, Gisborne Boys’ High School. Boys in a grey school uniform stream out of a building with a colourful crest above its central doors. In a woodwork room, a student leaves a carved panel with others leaning against a wall. Around an outdoor table, a group of students use an industrial-sized container of margarine to butter many slices of white bread.

 

Audio

(Craig): We were asked to bring students with us to Wellington, and so that whole selection process for those boys who had stood up and been part of the judging and the preparation of the application. They walked around and they worked the audience, and everybody had to go meet three people that they'd never met before in their lives. And before, when we looked around, there were boys with three or four people here, half a dozen people here, and they were just telling their story and interacting with some of New Zealand's most famous people.


Visual

Henk, in a white shirt and dark-coloured trousers, walks through school grounds where students in white and green uniforms and some in yellow PE tops play handball, clamber on an obstacle course and mill about in groups.

 

Audio

(Henk): It's an unusual feeling because, on the one hand, you're elated and pleased to be there and recognised, and then on the other hand, you sort of don't want to be seen as the smart-arses around the place.

 

Visual

A white-haired man in a dark suit and a striped tie. His name is in a banner along the bottom of the screen: Tom Parsons, Judge — 2014 & 2015. In a high school classroom, students work. A woman with glasses and curly brown hair leans on a desk as one of her students gesticulates. An older man with greying hair shows a tall student wearing safety goggles how to measure a wooden frame of a structure being built. In a workshop, a man shows a student how to cut wood with a bench saw. A group of female students in koru-patterned black tops and red skirts sit cross-legged on the floor. Adults sitting in an audience nod.

 

Audio

(Tom): Some of the things that are going on within the school boundaries are absolutely innovative, and if they're not innovative, they're excellent. And that level of excellence is really surprising. It's outstanding. Mums and dads aren't aware of it. They should be.

 

Visual

A grey-haired man with black framed glasses wears a charcoal coloured suit and a tie with a grey woven pattern. In the banner, it reads: Ken McIntosh Principal, Central Regional Health School. A teenage boy in a black hoodie sits at a table with a woman with shoulder-length blonde hair. She goes over his work, marking the page with a red pen. A woman with her auburn hair tied up leans her cheek on her hand which bears a thick silver ring as she speaks with a student.

 

Audio

(Ken): It's been a very positive and encouraging time to see that, actually, we are pretty good at what we're doing, and we've been recognised by other people. They're proud, and they're also humbled by it too.

 

Visual

Greg and Craig are in a school office. They look at a computer screen which shows a line graph titled: Gisborne Boys’ High School, NCEA L1-3 Māori, 2011-2014.

 

Audio

(Craig): In some ways, you could even say it should be compulsory every five years for every organisation to have a go at it, because it's a review of your systems, it's a way of analysing what you've achieved and what you haven't achieved, and it's a way of setting goals for the future. So, there you go. You can have that one for free. (CHUCKLES)

Telling your story

Te tuku o tō kōrero

Visual

A student in a grey school uniform uses a hammer and chisel to carve wood. A grey-haired man in a dark suit and a red and black-striped tie. His name appears in a banner along the bottom of the screen: Greg Mackle, Principal, Gisborne Boys’ High School. A panel of intricately carved wood has been stained a brick-red colour. A student carves wood nearby. Teenagers in a blue uniform perform a haka, crouching slightly and with their forearms crossed one above the other in front of their faces.

 

Audio

(Greg): Start at the beginning. ‘What was the challenge? What were you trying to do?’

In our case it was pretty simple – Māori boys were not achieving. Tell your story to show that you have made a difference to what you set out to achieve at the start.

 

Visual

A smiling grey-haired man dressed similarly to Greg Mackle, wearing the same red and black-striped tie. His name appears in a banner along the bottom of the screen: Tom Cairns, Assistant Principal, Gisborne Boys’ High School. At a monument atop a hill overlooking a bay, students in grey and red uniforms stand in rows. A man in a grey hoodie stands atop a bench behind them. The students walk down the hill together in a large group.

 

Audio

(Tom Cairns): Firstly, the boss put the pamphlet on my desk (CHUCKLES) as something to think about, so I sort of looked at it and thought, ‘Yeah, that looks like a bit of hard work’ and ignored it for a few days. I was surprised with the amount of work that we had already done. It’s a programme that had been running for several years, so we had the data; it was just a matter of putting it all together, I guess. So it was a pleasant surprise, I guess.

 

Visual

A man with greying hair and a goatee wears black rimmed glasses and a black striped tie. Henk Popping, Principal, Ōtūmoetai Intermediate School.

 

Audio

(Henk): One of the initial motivators was we had an ERO visit coming up the following term,

so you might as well do two things at once. (CHUCKLES)

 

Visual

A woman with shoulder-length blonde hair wears a black jacket over an orange top. Karla Ralph, Acting Principal, Coastal Taranaki School.

 

Audio

(Karla): Anybody can do this – applying for the Excellence Awards – because it’s about you and your journey, and if you've got some evidence of all of the amazing things that you’re doing, then go for it.

 

Visual

Three woman all dressed in black and white clothes sit on a park bench in front of a lush green garden. As the woman on the right speaks, her name appears in a banner along the bottom of the screen: Kelly Abraham, Centre Manager, Barnardos Kidstart, Hastings. The woman on the left of the bench smiles and nods. Her name appears in a banner at the bottom of the screen: Rebecca Thompson, Teacher, Barnardos Kidstart, Hastings.

 

Audio

(Kelly): We shared stories about parent-infant classes which we provided free for the community. We also shared stories around building relationships with hapū and iwi, celebrations, events. Just that day-to-day engagement with parents.

(Rebecca): We pulled the qualitative out by looking at our strong self-reviews, learning stories and the stories from our whānau.

 

Visual

On a document, a large table is titled: Dreamweaver Teacher Feedback Form. Seated at a table in a school library, a woman with short red hair wears a finger-knitted necklace of coloured wool. A man wearing glasses nods as he listens to her speak.

 

Audio

(Karla): We looked at our attendance and our behaviour and our academic data and how were we going to present that? So we broke it down, we chunked it, like we do as teachers. We looked at, ‘Well, what do people need to know? They don’t know anything about us and who we are, so how are we going to tell our story?’

 

Visual

A woman with long auburn hair wears frameless glasses and a black and white cardigan. Her name appears in a banner along the bottom of the screen: Dy Stirling, Kaihautū, Nōku Te Ao. Small children play on swings in an early childhood centre’s playground.

 

Audio

(Dy): They haven’t seen anything like us before. We are not a kōhanga reo and we are not a mainstream centre, so we are always telling our story to people so that they know who we are, where we are from. We come from Te Ahikāroa kapa haka or rōpū. Desperate housewives who had their little kids around them, and we wanted something different for our children, and so we created it ourselves.

 

Visual

A grey-haired man wearing a red jacket meets with Henk Popping in a conference room. Two other men are also at the table.

 

Audio

(Henk): We were talking about a seven-year journey, so we had to first of all explain what that journey was. We had explanations of the people we were working with, what their role was, the structure within the school.

 

Visual

A man in a white shirt walks with a student in a grey and green uniform through a bustling school playground. Up on a stage, a teenage girl leads a large group through a kapa haka routine. Her left hand shakes in a wiri by her face. A woman points to a display on a classroom wall titled: Te Wharenui me te Marae O Tauranga Moana. Different images of marae surround a map with string pointing out their various locations.

 

Audio

(Henk): We also sent in video clips, so that was a useful one, I think. Some of the feedback we got as a school was that the judges found that really useful to see. Putting faces and the school in a sort of a visual sense in front of the judges – not just a piece of paper or facts and figures.

 

Visual

A woman with dark brunette hair wears a black top and large flower earrings with purple petals around a yellow centre. Her name appears in a banner along the bottom of the screen: Steffan Brough, Expert – 2014 & 2015.

 

Audio

(Steffan): It has to be something that inspire them, because that does come through in the entries. You can see whether or not they’ve been passionate about it and have got excited about it themselves. So I think it does have to be something where you feel as though you’ve made a significant breakthrough of some sort.

 

Visual

A small child wearing a pink jumper grins as she goes through flash cards in te reo with a teacher. Preschool-aged children look through a picture book together.

 

Audio

(Dy): I just finished my post grad. It’s similar to doing an assignment, really. You look at what they’re looking for, you make sure that they’ve got all the criteria right, you know, and then you just fit your story into that as best you can, I think. I mean, you've got a degree to be a teacher, so you’ll know how to do it.

 

Visual

A group of small children in brightly coloured raincoats walk up a hill. They duck under an arching trunk of a fallen tree. A white-haired man in dark suit with striped tie: Tom Parsons, Judge – 2014 & 2015.

 

Audio

(Tom Parsons): Every story has a beginning, middle and end. Whether you’re at the end or not, it’s neither here nor there, but you should be able to indicate to us the beginning and the middle and where you expect the ending to be and have the evidence to support that.


Visual

Smiling children in raincoats run across a field in Auckland’s Cornwall Park.

What the judges look for

Tā ngā kaiawhakawā e kimi ana

Visual

Green leaves on a bush shine on a sunny day as students walk along a path that runs between classrooms. A dark-haired woman wears a black top and large flower earrings with purple petals surrounding a yellow centre. A banner appears below her, reading: Steffan Brough, Expert — 2014 & 2015.

 

Audio

(Steffan): I don't think you need to start with a big idea to make an application. It could be something relatively small. For example, we had an application which involved a centre looking at how they were going to make the best possible provision for a child with a disability who was coming to join them.


Visual

A grey-haired man in a suit and tie sits beside a woman with short black hair who wears a top patterned in blue, green and white. A banner appears below the man, reading: Tom Parsons, Judge — 2014 & 2015. A group of school kids sit around a green table in a classroom, making circuits with wires, batteries and small light bulbs. A girl in a pink and white fleece hoodie smiles brightly as she attaches wires to her light bulb. A woman wearing glasses and a long-sleeve green jersey leans over a table, helping three kids with their circuit. A woman wearing black framed glasses and with her blonde hair tied back has a name badge on her navy blue top. She kneels down at a table between two boys in grey-coloured school uniforms. She shows them a work sheet and the boys smile and nod.

 

Audio

(Tom): I think the question that is often asked of the judges and the expert panel, ‘Do we need to get a professional scriptwriter to script the pages and the video?’ And that's not the case at all.

(Steffan): They need to look at multiple types of evidence, they need to think about student voice, parent/whānau voice and teacher voice. They need to look at outcomes for children – not just in terms of data, not just in terms of changes in achievement, for example – they need to look at outcomes such as changes in children's attitude, changes in the way that children engage, changes in skill and competency levels. All of those things need to be part of a picture that you paint for your entry.

 

Visual

A banner appears below the white-haired man in the suit, Tom, and the woman in the blue, green and white top. It bears her name: Arihia Stirling, Expert — 2015. Students in blue short-sleeved uniform shirts and ties wear safety goggles as they work with eye droppers and beakers at a science room table. Two of the students make notes as a woman in a black and white stripped top and a black vest speaks to them. The woman also wears safety glasses and one of the students cocks his head as he listens to her.

 

Audio

(Arihia): It's about any school that has a wonderful story to tell about how great their learning space is. That's what this awards is about – to make sure that those stories are told. And they do reside in all sorts of spaces – you know, rural schools, Māori schools, different types of ethnic environments.

 

Visual

In the early evening, a group of women sit around a table in a school staffroom. The table is covered in folders and laptops. A title page on the cover of a red folder reads: Waikirkiri School Reading Data Folder. The women all listen as a woman with short silvery hair and a moko on her chin speaks.

 

Audio

(Steffan): The connection between the Best Evidence Synthesis and an application really has to be made clear, and I think that's looking at what are those domains in the Best Evidence Synthesis? For example, you've really got to make a connection in your application between the ways in which teaching and learning have changed and the way in which that engagement with the child has changed.

 

Visual

A tiki design has been sketched on to some wood that’s ready to be carved. A man with a beard runs his hand over the wood, gesturing to an area where carving has already begun. A police officer stands at the front of a high school classroom. A pot plant sits on the desk in front of him. The rows of desks are populated by teenage boys in red and grey school uniforms. Outside, some students use blocks of wood to bang chisels into a pole that they’re carving.

 

Audio

(Tom): In the judging process, the importance of a variety of voices is very, very important. There has not been one instance a judge has gone out to a school and not wanted to talk to past pupils, Board of Trustees, Police, CYFs in some instances, past staff. It's all part of the package.


Visual

A group of adults sit around a table, talking and looking at their laptops. A woman with shoulder-length grey hair and wearing a grey scarf over her black top has a folder open and is looking at some brightly coloured pages with a boy in a red and grey striped hoodie. The pages in the folder contain photos of children setting up a toy racetrack in a classroom.

 

Audio

(Steffan): It would be a great idea if people actually look at those levers of learning and think about what they have done in relation to them. So looking at those educationally powerful connections, looking at ways in which leadership has either driven this or supported the development that you want and then looked beyond that to how have we sustained a cycle of enquiry so that we've got continuous real-time information that helps us shape our development in a way that's ultimately going to arrive at what it is that we want as outcomes.

(Tom): One of the things the judges look at quite closely is the sustainability. If you took a major player out in that whole excellence scenario, would it still be sustainable going forward?


Visual

Walls of a classroom are covered in photos, documents and pictures. Two women sit at a table, in discussion. Seen through a glass panel in a door, students in purple uniform polo shirts sit in chairs with two older women with grey hair. Inside the room there are other groups of students sitting with other older women.

 

Audio

(Steffan): When people are putting data into their entry, they need to show us the significance of it. Why is that data there and why is that data important and what is that data showing? It may be self-evident to them because they've been working with it, but we're new to that information. We need to be able to see how it connects through to the valued outcomes that they want for their children.

(Tom): The most important piece of advice I think I would give to any school would be to tell the story as it is. Don't dress it up, because the expert panel sees through that if it's cosmetic, and that's not what they're looking for. They did a great stocktake of how well you and your staff are doing against national criteria. It is a super innovation.


Visual

In a room with woven tukutuku panels on the walls, adults and students play a game where they have to keep rhythm while doing the correct hand movements. The adults laugh and clap as they mess up, ending the game.


Audio

(PEOPLE CHANT AND LAUGH)

Entry FAQs

Ngā Pātai Auau

Check out the eligibility criteria and get the answers to the most common questions about entering the Awards.

Tirohia ngā tikanga māraurau me ngā whakautu ki ngā pātai auau mō te whakauru ki ngā Tohu.

Resources

Ngā Rauemi

These resources will help you tell a clear and compelling story about your team’s achievements.

Hei āwhina ēnei rauemi i a koe ki te taki i tō kōrero kia mārama, kia manawarū hoki mō ngā tutukitanga a tō rōpū.

Evidence

Ngā Taunakitanga

Your evidence is a key part of your entry. Find out how to put it to best use in your entry.

Ko ngā taunakitanga tētahi wāhanga tino whaitake o tō tono. Tirohia ngā kōrero kia mōhio me pēhea te whakamahi kia whai hua ai ki tō tono.