GET INSPIRED

HEI WHAKAAWE I A KOUTOU

View Transcript

Transcript

00:01

[Music]

00:02

the Education Review office talked about

00:05

a help calm at felt here now that was a

00:08

really interesting adjective to use

00:09

because I wouldn't afford it was can

00:10

it's but it is peaceful but calm really

00:14

did my heart good because I thought yes

00:16

this is an environment where there were

00:18

fights galore on the field it was pretty

00:21

scary if you like and needed someone to

00:24

care for the place that needed someone

00:25

to want to be here so now the

00:27

environment is peaceful that's also very

00:31

dynamic incredibly busy based on a lot

00:34

of positive things to bring good people

00:36

through or passionate about kids who

00:39

know what at work in this space I'm

00:40

proud of the people that we've managed

00:43

to attract to our school to help

00:45

contribute to that well kids my sake and

00:52

the school is just having has been

00:53

utterly passionate about this community

00:55

and these people and being able to give

00:58

them an educational journey that is

01:01

going to set them on a really fantastic

01:02

pathway for the rest of their lives if

01:04

the value of a try was never changed to

01:06

five points what the same team have won

01:09

the game the teachers are driven to help

01:13

the kids in more averse situation

01:15

whether they're low achievers high

01:17

achievers they cater for everybody

01:19

I like how our school celebrates each

01:22

new ones quarter

01:28

these kids they just have that energy

01:32

that that that curiosity that that's

01:35

spark in them that you just don't find

01:37

anywhere else

01:38

I chose fear the reaction cards as this

01:41

hidden a whole bunch of our kids have

01:43

this amazing capability to be young

01:45

leaders we do have a whole bunch of

01:48

systems to recognize potential to

01:50

develop their potential we're the

01:52

generation the future generation of the

01:54

leaders I wish we had a school like this

01:56

when I was this age I'm like new kids

01:59

are so lucky we have evenings throughout

02:01

the year where parents come in and

02:02

that's our target to say look this is

02:04

what we're doing this is something you

02:05

could try at home with your child we're

02:07

empowering them and they love that my

02:09

palm I'm proud I'm proud to be Who I am

02:12

in it we've seen engagement increase

02:14

we've seen an attendance increase we've

02:16

seen community coming to school they

02:18

want to be here they want to sort of be

02:20

part of their kids learning journey I

02:21

actually think that our children are

02:23

very very fortunate to be in this school

02:26

the kids in our community they deserve

02:28

to have the best leaders the best

02:30

teachers the best support staff and

02:32

that's our ongoing challenge to make

02:34

sure we always try and get the best

02:36

people to help them play deserve it

02:37

they've made me become a proud person on

02:41

all of my coaches and I'm just happy

02:44

that I can take something with me and

02:46

keep it inside of me and spread it

02:48

around all of our community

02:51

not even our community the world

02:56

you

00:01

[Music]

00:02

the Education Review office talked about

00:05

a help calm at felt here now that was a

00:08

really interesting adjective to use

00:09

because I wouldn't afford it was can

00:10

it's but it is peaceful but calm really

00:14

did my heart good because I thought yes

00:16

this is an environment where there were

00:18

fights galore on the field it was pretty

00:21

scary if you like and needed someone to

00:24

care for the place that needed someone

00:25

to want to be here so now the

00:27

environment is peaceful that's also very

00:31

dynamic incredibly busy based on a lot

00:34

of positive things to bring good people

00:36

through or passionate about kids who

00:39

know what at work in this space I'm

00:40

proud of the people that we've managed

00:43

to attract to our school to help

00:45

contribute to that well kids my sake and

00:52

the school is just having has been

00:53

utterly passionate about this community

00:55

and these people and being able to give

00:58

them an educational journey that is

01:01

going to set them on a really fantastic

01:02

pathway for the rest of their lives if

01:04

the value of a try was never changed to

01:06

five points what the same team have won

01:09

the game the teachers are driven to help

01:13

the kids in more averse situation

01:15

whether they're low achievers high

01:17

achievers they cater for everybody

01:19

I like how our school celebrates each

01:22

new ones quarter

01:28

these kids they just have that energy

01:32

that that that curiosity that that's

01:35

spark in them that you just don't find

01:37

anywhere else

01:38

I chose fear the reaction cards as this

01:41

hidden a whole bunch of our kids have

01:43

this amazing capability to be young

01:45

leaders we do have a whole bunch of

01:48

systems to recognize potential to

01:50

develop their potential we're the

01:52

generation the future generation of the

01:54

leaders I wish we had a school like this

01:56

when I was this age I'm like new kids

01:59

are so lucky we have evenings throughout

02:01

the year where parents come in and

02:02

that's our target to say look this is

02:04

what we're doing this is something you

02:05

could try at home with your child we're

02:07

empowering them and they love that my

02:09

palm I'm proud I'm proud to be Who I am

02:12

in it we've seen engagement increase

02:14

we've seen an attendance increase we've

02:16

seen community coming to school they

02:18

want to be here they want to sort of be

02:20

part of their kids learning journey I

02:21

actually think that our children are

02:23

very very fortunate to be in this school

02:26

the kids in our community they deserve

02:28

to have the best leaders the best

02:30

teachers the best support staff and

02:32

that's our ongoing challenge to make

02:34

sure we always try and get the best

02:36

people to help them play deserve it

02:37

they've made me become a proud person on

02:41

all of my coaches and I'm just happy

02:44

that I can take something with me and

02:46

keep it inside of me and spread it

02:48

around all of our community

02:51

not even our community the world

02:56

you

Close Transcript Close Transcript

The community is part of the journey

He wāhi anō tō te hapori

This school made whānau part of the learning journey and brought the whole community together.

Nā te kura i whakarite kia whai wāhi mai ngā whānau ki te akoranga, nā tēnei anō i kotahi ai te hapori.

Learn more
View Transcript

Transcript

00:02

Parents and the community, even up the coast,

00:05

are seeing that Boys' High is offering something

00:07

that no other school and Tairāwhiti is offering.

00:10

And that’s why we are getting an abundance of boys

00:13

coming through because they want to pick up

00:15

this taonga, this treasure that we have.

00:16

(Teacher chanting in Māori)

00:20

We were able to take a programme and develop

00:23

it here for our young men, Tu Tane.

00:26

Who are you and who are you going to be in the future?

00:29

Who do you want to be?

00:31

What type of footprint are you going to leave behind?

00:33

I never thought about myself in that kind of way before,

00:36

I‘ve never really thought about who I am

00:38

and where I was from. But I think Tu Tane

00:42

just makes you think about yourself a lot more.

00:44

We wanted to get away from the stereotypical ritual

00:49

of what it was to be a good man, following these

00:53

different rites of passage.

00:54

If you fulfill your true potential not only will you help

01:00

out in your own whānau, you may even contribute to

01:02

New Zealand as a whole, or to the world.

01:04

By the end of the year by the time we finish the camp

01:07

which is the final milestone for the year

01:10

the guys are pretty close as a group.

01:12

There's a real sense of recognising other people's

01:14

struggles and also recognising how you can help that

01:20

and how you can be the best man you can be.

01:22

Hui e, taiki e.

01:25

It comes back to our school motto

01:27

'Courage Knows No Defeat'.

01:29

If you haven’t got the courage to step forward

01:31

and take up a challenge

01:34

then you’ll never know what you can achieve.

01:36

If we look up here we’ll see the Whakairo

01:38

that matua Derek Ladelli established years ago for

01:42

our school. Those are the waka that came and inhabited

01:46

this area here in the Tairāwhiti.

01:48

We like to have a football in one arm

01:50

and a girl in the other arm and that’s what young

01:53

15 year olds are like the world over.

01:55

But Whakairo brings something different out in us.

01:59

Our aim was always to emulate

02:01

these awesome carvings

02:03

so that people can see the legacy as being continued.

02:07

It’s a passion to grab a whao and a kuru,

02:10

a mallet and a chisel, and to create

02:14

and it's something that comes from your forefathers

02:16

right down the lines since they came from Hawaiki.

02:19

It just strengthens that union of tupuna

02:22

and to have it come down through Sean

02:24

it's really touching as a parent

02:26

to see the work that your children

02:28

can create being in this Whakairo environment.

02:30

We knew the parents and the family

02:32

would be blown away

02:33

and they loved it

02:35

to the point where some people

02:37

have been bought to tears

02:38

looking at their sons work.

02:40

What we’ve also been able to do

02:41

is take the body of knowledge

02:43

of Whakairo and to take those skills

02:47

and encompass them in many of the units

02:50

involved in some of the other curriculum areas.

02:52

Last year our Māori boys out performed

02:55

our non Māori boys at level 2.

02:57

Well I’ll be interested in buying this one

02:59

at the end of the year

03:00

because we are always buying one for the school

03:02

but it’s got to mean something

03:03

and in terms of what you just said,

03:05

"a young man being looked after by the guardians'',

03:08

is pretty important I reckon.

03:10

The success has bred success.

03:13

Achievement has bred achievement.

03:15

The credibility of the Whakairo course at our school,

03:20

by our staff, by our community

03:22

has fulfilled everything that we set out to do.

03:25

Our year twelves and our year thirteens

03:27

are fantastic young men.

03:29

They have a real relationship with our younger year nine

03:33

and year tens

03:34

and I’ve got absolutely no doubt that is the foundation

03:38

of what they learnt in Tu Tane.

03:40

In terms of behavioural problems,

03:43

the results are absolutely remarkable, and

03:45

year tens are often the ones who got suspended a lot.

03:47

We’ve had no suspensions this year.

03:49

They were making better judgements

03:52

about whether or not to do that really stupid thing.

03:55

ERO looked into that

03:56

and we became one of their good practice schools

03:59

for reduction in stand-down and suspension,

04:03

based around Tu Tane programme and Whakairo.

04:06

Our very first class graduated last year.

04:09

Those boys are in university and we see them around

04:11

town it’s easy to have a chat and you know to catch up.

04:15

The community and the school community

04:17

are saying "Wow look at these young guys

04:19

and look at what they're capable of doing".

04:21

(Haka)

00:02

Parents and the community, even up the coast,

00:05

are seeing that Boys' High is offering something

00:07

that no other school and Tairāwhiti is offering.

00:10

And that’s why we are getting an abundance of boys

00:13

coming through because they want to pick up

00:15

this taonga, this treasure that we have.

00:16

(Teacher chanting in Māori)

00:20

We were able to take a programme and develop

00:23

it here for our young men, Tu Tane.

00:26

Who are you and who are you going to be in the future?

00:29

Who do you want to be?

00:31

What type of footprint are you going to leave behind?

00:33

I never thought about myself in that kind of way before,

00:36

I‘ve never really thought about who I am

00:38

and where I was from. But I think Tu Tane

00:42

just makes you think about yourself a lot more.

00:44

We wanted to get away from the stereotypical ritual

00:49

of what it was to be a good man, following these

00:53

different rites of passage.

00:54

If you fulfill your true potential not only will you help

01:00

out in your own whānau, you may even contribute to

01:02

New Zealand as a whole, or to the world.

01:04

By the end of the year by the time we finish the camp

01:07

which is the final milestone for the year

01:10

the guys are pretty close as a group.

01:12

There's a real sense of recognising other people's

01:14

struggles and also recognising how you can help that

01:20

and how you can be the best man you can be.

01:22

Hui e, taiki e.

01:25

It comes back to our school motto

01:27

'Courage Knows No Defeat'.

01:29

If you haven’t got the courage to step forward

01:31

and take up a challenge

01:34

then you’ll never know what you can achieve.

01:36

If we look up here we’ll see the Whakairo

01:38

that matua Derek Ladelli established years ago for

01:42

our school. Those are the waka that came and inhabited

01:46

this area here in the Tairāwhiti.

01:48

We like to have a football in one arm

01:50

and a girl in the other arm and that’s what young

01:53

15 year olds are like the world over.

01:55

But Whakairo brings something different out in us.

01:59

Our aim was always to emulate

02:01

these awesome carvings

02:03

so that people can see the legacy as being continued.

02:07

It’s a passion to grab a whao and a kuru,

02:10

a mallet and a chisel, and to create

02:14

and it's something that comes from your forefathers

02:16

right down the lines since they came from Hawaiki.

02:19

It just strengthens that union of tupuna

02:22

and to have it come down through Sean

02:24

it's really touching as a parent

02:26

to see the work that your children

02:28

can create being in this Whakairo environment.

02:30

We knew the parents and the family

02:32

would be blown away

02:33

and they loved it

02:35

to the point where some people

02:37

have been bought to tears

02:38

looking at their sons work.

02:40

What we’ve also been able to do

02:41

is take the body of knowledge

02:43

of Whakairo and to take those skills

02:47

and encompass them in many of the units

02:50

involved in some of the other curriculum areas.

02:52

Last year our Māori boys out performed

02:55

our non Māori boys at level 2.

02:57

Well I’ll be interested in buying this one

02:59

at the end of the year

03:00

because we are always buying one for the school

03:02

but it’s got to mean something

03:03

and in terms of what you just said,

03:05

"a young man being looked after by the guardians'',

03:08

is pretty important I reckon.

03:10

The success has bred success.

03:13

Achievement has bred achievement.

03:15

The credibility of the Whakairo course at our school,

03:20

by our staff, by our community

03:22

has fulfilled everything that we set out to do.

03:25

Our year twelves and our year thirteens

03:27

are fantastic young men.

03:29

They have a real relationship with our younger year nine

03:33

and year tens

03:34

and I’ve got absolutely no doubt that is the foundation

03:38

of what they learnt in Tu Tane.

03:40

In terms of behavioural problems,

03:43

the results are absolutely remarkable, and

03:45

year tens are often the ones who got suspended a lot.

03:47

We’ve had no suspensions this year.

03:49

They were making better judgements

03:52

about whether or not to do that really stupid thing.

03:55

ERO looked into that

03:56

and we became one of their good practice schools

03:59

for reduction in stand-down and suspension,

04:03

based around Tu Tane programme and Whakairo.

04:06

Our very first class graduated last year.

04:09

Those boys are in university and we see them around

04:11

town it’s easy to have a chat and you know to catch up.

04:15

The community and the school community

04:17

are saying "Wow look at these young guys

04:19

and look at what they're capable of doing".

04:21

(Haka)

Close Transcript Close Transcript

Redefining what it means to be a man

Te whakaahua anō i te tū a te tāne

This school reframed stereotypes of masculinity and connected a generation of young Gisborne men to their whakapapa.

Nā tēnei kura i whakahāngai i te tū a te tāne me te tūhono hoki i ngā taitamatāne o Tūranga ki ō rātou whakapapa.

Learn more
View Transcript

Transcript

00:04

I suppose it began in October of 2012.

00:07

Natalia and her mum came for a look

00:10

round the centre to enroll and we were

00:13

aware that Natalia was profoundly deaf.

00:15

So that sort of began our interest

00:18

in deaf culture.

00:19

Natalia sort of went from the nursery,

00:21

where the teachers were signing a lot,

00:23

and then moved into the preschool where

00:25

they probably hadn't learnt as much.

00:27

But then they just came on board with the

00:29

whole thing and I just noticed the change

00:33

in her behaviour and her actually

00:35

wanting to be here, once they started

00:37

really coming on board and learning heaps.

00:39

That made a huge difference to her,

00:41

you know, that she's being recognised

00:43

in that way.

00:44

We wanted to be able to communicate

00:46

with Natalia, her brother Jayden

00:48

and her father, who are all deaf, and we

00:51

wanted to be able to commuicate

00:52

with them in the way that they

00:53

communicate together at home with sign.

00:57

We started with DVDs and posters and

01:00

different resources that we gained from Liz

01:03

and from Van Asch Deaf School.

01:05

We started teaching the other teachers,

01:07

started teaching the children

01:09

and we were just absolutely astounded at

01:11

how quickly the children were soaking it up

01:14

and how eager they were to learn more.

01:16

Now Josh, what can you sign?

01:19

A monkey.

01:20

Good monkey! A monkey.

01:22

Sign language is so powerful

01:24

especially when you're getting, you know,

01:25

the littlies starting from one.

01:27

They're able to communicate what they

01:29

want and what they need.

01:30

They don't have those frustrations and so

01:32

for all the kids here they're able to have

01:34

that, you know, that priviledge really

01:37

of being able to communicate

01:38

in two languages.

01:41

We are getting a bit of

01:42

knowledge from Natalia.

01:44

It's important, it's a learning tool

01:47

and it's also fun you know, we make it fun

01:50

instead of just something that's a must.

01:54

But we just turn it into a positive.

01:58

It's been amazing.

01:59

All the kids have embraced it.

02:01

Other parents are enjoying the fact that

02:04

the whole centre is learning sign language.

02:06

It means that our kids are a part of

02:09

the centre and it's not just something that

02:11

they're doing specially for them,

02:13

it's something for everyone that

02:14

everyone's benefiting from and that's

02:17

the cool thing because as a parent

02:18

you don't want to be like 'oh we're, you

02:20

know, burdening this extra load on you'.

02:22

It's like it's enjoyable.

02:24

Everyone's loving it. Yeah.

02:26

One day he sat at the table playing

02:28

preschools and he was moving his hands

02:31

about and I'm like what are you doing?

02:33

and he says 'Mum don't you know?

02:35

It's sign language.'

02:37

And he was teaching me sign language!

02:39

And I was like well I definitely have to go

02:40

to school and learn that one so yeah,

02:42

he was doing really well and he

02:43

does it at home.

02:44

He doesn't judge, he just takes his time

02:46

and he understands that there's a problem

02:48

with people's ears and he, yeah, he looks

02:51

for a different way of talking to them.

02:53

We have decided now

02:55

where we're going to.

02:57

I think it's really important to continue

02:59

setting goals so that this continues

03:01

as an every day part of our centre life.

03:03

I don't think you need to have

03:05

a deaf student at your centre to be able to

03:08

learn sign language and see it's

03:10

benefits for all children.

00:04

I suppose it began in October of 2012.

00:07

Natalia and her mum came for a look

00:10

round the centre to enroll and we were

00:13

aware that Natalia was profoundly deaf.

00:15

So that sort of began our interest

00:18

in deaf culture.

00:19

Natalia sort of went from the nursery,

00:21

where the teachers were signing a lot,

00:23

and then moved into the preschool where

00:25

they probably hadn't learnt as much.

00:27

But then they just came on board with the

00:29

whole thing and I just noticed the change

00:33

in her behaviour and her actually

00:35

wanting to be here, once they started

00:37

really coming on board and learning heaps.

00:39

That made a huge difference to her,

00:41

you know, that she's being recognised

00:43

in that way.

00:44

We wanted to be able to communicate

00:46

with Natalia, her brother Jayden

00:48

and her father, who are all deaf, and we

00:51

wanted to be able to commuicate

00:52

with them in the way that they

00:53

communicate together at home with sign.

00:57

We started with DVDs and posters and

01:00

different resources that we gained from Liz

01:03

and from Van Asch Deaf School.

01:05

We started teaching the other teachers,

01:07

started teaching the children

01:09

and we were just absolutely astounded at

01:11

how quickly the children were soaking it up

01:14

and how eager they were to learn more.

01:16

Now Josh, what can you sign?

01:19

A monkey.

01:20

Good monkey! A monkey.

01:22

Sign language is so powerful

01:24

especially when you're getting, you know,

01:25

the littlies starting from one.

01:27

They're able to communicate what they

01:29

want and what they need.

01:30

They don't have those frustrations and so

01:32

for all the kids here they're able to have

01:34

that, you know, that priviledge really

01:37

of being able to communicate

01:38

in two languages.

01:41

We are getting a bit of

01:42

knowledge from Natalia.

01:44

It's important, it's a learning tool

01:47

and it's also fun you know, we make it fun

01:50

instead of just something that's a must.

01:54

But we just turn it into a positive.

01:58

It's been amazing.

01:59

All the kids have embraced it.

02:01

Other parents are enjoying the fact that

02:04

the whole centre is learning sign language.

02:06

It means that our kids are a part of

02:09

the centre and it's not just something that

02:11

they're doing specially for them,

02:13

it's something for everyone that

02:14

everyone's benefiting from and that's

02:17

the cool thing because as a parent

02:18

you don't want to be like 'oh we're, you

02:20

know, burdening this extra load on you'.

02:22

It's like it's enjoyable.

02:24

Everyone's loving it. Yeah.

02:26

One day he sat at the table playing

02:28

preschools and he was moving his hands

02:31

about and I'm like what are you doing?

02:33

and he says 'Mum don't you know?

02:35

It's sign language.'

02:37

And he was teaching me sign language!

02:39

And I was like well I definitely have to go

02:40

to school and learn that one so yeah,

02:42

he was doing really well and he

02:43

does it at home.

02:44

He doesn't judge, he just takes his time

02:46

and he understands that there's a problem

02:48

with people's ears and he, yeah, he looks

02:51

for a different way of talking to them.

02:53

We have decided now

02:55

where we're going to.

02:57

I think it's really important to continue

02:59

setting goals so that this continues

03:01

as an every day part of our centre life.

03:03

I don't think you need to have

03:05

a deaf student at your centre to be able to

03:08

learn sign language and see it's

03:10

benefits for all children.

Close Transcript Close Transcript

Sign language at the centre of learning

Ko te reo rotarota te pūtake o te ako

This early learning service responded to the enrolment of a deaf learner with a surprising strategy – one that changed learning for every child at the centre.

Nā te whakaurutanga o tētahi ākonga turi i whakaritea e tēnei kura kōhungahunga tētahi rautaki rerekē - nāna i panoni ai te ako mō ia tamaiti i te kura.

Learn more
Flaxmere Winners

PRIZES AND BENEFITS

NGĀ PARAIHE ME NGĀ PAINGA

The winning school, kura or early childhood service in each of the four categories and Education Focus Prize will receive a package that includes a trophy, a certificate, a $20,000 financial award and professional development opportunities.

Ko te toa mō ia wāhanga me te Taonga Mātauranga, mehemea he kura, he ratonga kōhungahunga rānei, ka whiwhi i tētahi taonga, he tiwhikete, he pūtea e $20,000 te rahi me te whai wāhi atu ki ētahi kaupapa whakapiki ngaiotanga.

Person writing

THE JUDGING PROCESS:

TE TUKANGA WHAKAWĀ

The Judging Panel of New Zealand education leaders, academics and commentators is currently assessing this year’s entries and will announce the 2019 Finalists in June. Find out what’s involved as they make their decisions.

Kei te aromatawaitia ngā tono mō tēnei tau e te Paepae Kaiwhakawā, ā, hei te marama o Pipiri ka pānuitia ngā whiringa toa mō 2019. Tirohia ngā kōrero mō ā rātou mahi hei whakaoti whakatau.

Two teachers

GET STARTED FOR 2020:

TĪMATIAHIA MŌ 2020

2019 entries are now closed. If you missed entering this year, the good news is that it’s never too early to
start planning your entry for 2020. Start thinking about the stories your team could tell – and don’t forget to check out the eligibility criteria.

Kua kati kē ngā tono mō 2019. Mēnā kāore koe i whakarite tono i tēnei tau, he tau anō ki tua, hei aronga mā koutou. Me huri ō whakaaro ki te tau 2020. Whakaarohia ngā kōrero hei whakapuaki mā tō rōpū - kei wareware hoki ki te tirotiro i ngā tikanga māraurau.

LATEST UPDATES

NGĀ KŌRERO HOU

Stacey’s Shout-Out

Stacey Morrison recently had a few words of encouragement for schools who are thinking of entering the Awards. See what she had to say.

Tā Stacey Kupu Whakaaraara

Nōnātata nei i tukua e Stacey Morrison he kupu whakahau ki ngā kura e whakaaro ana ki te uru ki ngā Tohu. Tirohia āna kōrero.

IMPORTANT DATES FOR 2019

NGĀ RĀ MATUA MŌ 2019

ENTRIES OPEN KA TUWHERA NGĀ TONO

25 February 2019

25 Huitanguru 2019

ENTRIES CLOSE KA KATI NGĀ TONO

05 April 2019

05 Paengawhāwhā 2019

ENTRY ASSESSMENT TE AROMATAWAI TONO

April – May 2019

Paengawhāwhā – Haratua 2019

FINALISTS ANNOUNCED NGĀ TORONGA O NGĀ KAIWHAKAWĀ

June 2019

Pipiri 2019

JUDGING VISITS TE PŌ TUKU TOHU ME TE HĀKARI NUI

June 2019

Pipiri 2019

CEREMONY & GALA DINNER TE PŌ TUKU TOHU ME TE HĀKARI NUI

September 2019

Mahuru 2019